Need For Speed

Battle Group Poland U.S., U.K and 15th Mechanized Brigade Polish tactical vehicles perform river crossing training June 19 in Rukla, Lithuanian as part of the joint training exercise Iron Wolf which is held in conjunction with Saber Strike 17. The exercises include integrated and synchronized deterrence-oriented training designed to improve interoperability and readiness of the militaries of the 20 participating nations throughout the Baltic region and Poland. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Kevin Wang/Released)
Battle Group Poland U.S., U.K and 15th Mechanized Brigade Polish tactical vehicles perform river crossing training June 19 in Rukla, Lithuanian as part of the joint training exercise Iron Wolf which is held in conjunction with Saber Strike 17. The exercises include integrated and synchronized deterrence-oriented training designed to improve interoperability and readiness of the militaries of the 20 participating nations throughout the Baltic region and Poland. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Kevin Wang/Released)

Power Vertical Podcast at CEPA, Episode 6

It's the most vulnerable point in NATO's frontline and it is vital to the defense of the Baltic states.

If Russia and NATO ever engage in armed conflict in Europe, the epicenter is likely to be the Suwałki Corridor—a 65-kilometer strip of the Polish-Lithuanian border situated between Belarus and the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.

How vulnerable is the Suwałki Corridor? And what can be done to defend it?

On this week’s Power Vertical Podcast, I discuss this with LTG (Ret.) Frederick Benjamin Hodges, the former commander of U.S. Army Europe, currently the Pershing Chair in Strategic Studies at CEPA, and co-author of the upcoming report: Securing The Suwałki Corridor: Strategy, Statecraft, Deterrence, and Defense.

June 29, 2018